July 24, 2013

Glock 23 Gen 4 40 S&W, $650

We tested two 40 S&W handguns in the May 2013 issue. Here’s an excerpt of that report, “Two Midsize 40 S&W Pistols: Taurus and Glock Square Off,”.

We were able to get our hands on two mighty popular guns for this test, a couple of the potent 40-caliber mid-size pistols that we also compare to the two forties we tested in the March 2013 issue. This time we look at the Glock 23 Gen 4 (MSRP $650) and the Taurus 24/7 G2C (MSRP $555). We tested with the same ammo types, Remington 155-grain JHP, Black Hills 165-grain JHP, and American Eagle 180-grain FMC with its truncated-cone design.

Both of these guns came with loading helpers. We didn’t need one with the Glock unless we wanted to fully load the magazines. Commonly in our practice sessions, we load only five or ten for safety reasons, and these were easy to get into the Glock’s 13-round magazine using only our fingers. The Taurus needed the mag loader’s help for nearly all its rounds, having a magazine spring that was about twice as stout as that of the Glock. Of course, there were many other areas of comparison we considered, which we relate below:

Glock 23 Gen 4 40 S&W, $650

Out of the box the Glock felt mighty good. This version of the popular gun comes with several different back-strap contours that the owner can easily swap out to better suit his or her individual mitt. Neither of the two add-on grips make the grip any smaller, however. We liked the grip as it was. One of our big complaints about the previously tested S&W M&P Compact was its lack of traction to help us keep the gun from twisting in recoil The Glock and the Taurus don’t have that problem. Their grips were very well made for control, and we appreciated that right from the start.

May 2013

Slick and smooth with nothing on it that's not needed, the Glock 23 has been the best 40-cal pistol of four we've tested recently.

The Glock is all flat black, with a minimum of controls. There’s the trigger with its tiny but effective leaf that gives the gun all the safety it needs. We noted the contour of the trigger has been improved, and we liked it. The magazine release is reversible, and worked like it was supposed to. There was the slide stop, left side only, and protected with a molded-in ledge right below it. Finally, there were the take-down levers above the trigger opening. The “levers” are actually two ends of one plate-like piece. There was an accessory rail in front of the trigger guard.

The sights had a wide, square, U around the rear notch and a white dot on the front. Tritium sights are optional items. There was a tactile loaded-chamber indicator in the form of a slight step on the extractor that could be easily felt with the (right-hand) trigger finger. The top edges of the slide were smooth enough to not cut the hands during clearance drills. However, if you do many of them with stiff-spring guns, you’re going to hurt your hands, as we found out.

May 2013

The Glock was the easiest to take down for maintenance, and the easiest to get back together. This is a long-proven design.

Takedown was simple. With the gun empty and the magazine out, drop the striker, pull the slide back slightly and pull down on the takedown levers on both sides, and ease the slide forward off the frame. The captive spring comes easily out, and then you can get the barrel and guts as clean as you’d like. Reassembly is even simpler. We like to put some of Brian Enos’ Slide Glide (BrianEnos.com) on the rails. Then, with the barrel and spring in place in the slide, simply slip in back onto the frame and tug on the slide. The takedown levers will click up into place, and you’re ready to go. We thought the workmanship inside the Glock was excellent, just as it was on the outside.

Our Team Said: On the range we had zero problems. The trigger was decent and clean, and we were able to shoot groups in the 2.5- to 3-inch range with ease at 15 yards. The gun shot essentially where it looked, unlike the Taurus. The groups centered all three test loads within 2 inches of the aim point. The gun got the best groups with the heaviest bullets.

Comments (12)

I shot a Taurus 99 for several years,(15,000>rds.) When my wife began to shoot regularly with me, we switched to Glocks. Several things caused the change, but having both of us on the same platform was the biggest, and Glocks fit her better. We shoot 9mms because that is what I and my children in Law Enforcement and Military shot. Now I would prefer the 40cal., but changing the entire family is expensive.

Posted by: enviros | August 2, 2013 9:17 AM    Report this comment

I have owned both a Glock Gen4 and now own a Taurus 24/7 Gen2. I am one of those people who cannot shoot a Glock. For some reason, I will not fit my hand. Hence I could never bring it down on target. The 24/7 on the other hand was, out of the box, right on. The Glock was reliable and my 24/7 is also reliable. I'm a Parole Officer for the State Of Texas and I carry the Taurus daily. I have had no issues as of this date. The gun before this was a Taurus 92. 5,000 rounds later is still reliable. Iguess I said all that to say this; If a Glock, Sig, H&K, Taurus, or what ever works for you, use it. Stay safe.

Posted by: Rick12 | July 26, 2013 9:08 PM    Report this comment

I have owned both a Glock Gen4 and now own a Taurus 24/7 Gen2. I am one of those people who cannot shoot a Glock. For some reason, I will not fit my hand. Hence I could never bring it down on target. The 24/7 on the other hand was, out of the box, right on. The Glock was reliable and my 24/7 is also reliable. I'm a Parole Officer for the State Of Texas and I carry the Taurus daily. I have had no issues as of this date. The gun before this was a Taurus 92. 5,000 rounds later is still reliable. Iguess I said all that to say this; If a Glock, Sig, H&K, Taurus, or what ever works for you, use it. Stay safe.

Posted by: Rick12 | July 26, 2013 9:06 PM    Report this comment

Well, ordnance outsellers, I do like the grip of the old 1911 pistol, and I have a handful of those in my collection as well. I agree that habit plays a large role in our preferences, and perhaps my lack of enthusiasm for Glock pistols has a lot to do with my habits. Having a preference for DA/SA/DAK trigger systems also influences my favoritism for SIG Sauer pistols. That said, I must jump to agreement with OregonGreg in his praise for the CZ-75, and if I had to pick favorites between the CZ and SIG breeds, I'd be pretty hard pressed to do so, since I often carry a compact CZ-75D. In a Safariland kydex holster, I hardly know the Czech pistol is on my hip, and it feels great in the hand.....especially with the neoprene grips.

Posted by: canovack | July 26, 2013 4:54 PM    Report this comment

Hi Canovack,
I agree that "Grip Feel" is a very important consideration in a personal weapon. I learned on a great-feeling Ruger Security-Six with stock grips. That and the S&W line of full-size .357s are still some of my favorite recreational guns. I also love the sculpted steel of the CZ-75 (in any chambering). Bear in mind, however the context of the Gun Test article. It was written as a comparison between the Glock 22 Gen.4, and the competing Tausus .40 cal. My point remains. I would rather have a used G22 than a new Taurus 24/7 G2C. With only $95. difference in MSRP it is a no-brainer for me.

Posted by: OregonGreg | July 26, 2013 1:46 PM    Report this comment

carnovack, while we seem to agree on much, have to disagree with you somewhat here. All I've had to learn to do with Glock is push wrist over and lock it and now outshoot my Sigs; but much of credit is to DBTactical for action work. If you like grip angle of a 1911, Lone Wolf offers a custom frame that isn't too expensive? Now full size for 17,22,etc and have shipped a few for 19,23,etc. HABIT PLAYS A HUGE PART IN PEOPLE'S PREFERENCES~

Posted by: ordnance outsellers | July 26, 2013 1:09 PM    Report this comment

Having owned a handful of Glocks over the years, and currently owning none, I have confirmed and reconfirmed my love of SIG Sauer pistols and rifles. While I do agree that the virtues of simplicity, reliability, and durability are exemplified in the Glock pistol, I could never get over the odd sort of discomfort extant in my grasp of the Glock frame.....along with my impression of the complete lack of aesthetic appeal in the design of the gun. Much has been made of the grip angle of the Glock as being very similar to the grip angle of the much revered P-08 Luger, but as I own a few P-08s, the grip angle of that pistol is also not a comfortable one for my hands.

In my estimation, if one is intent on carrying a plastic framed simple operating, durable and reliable pistol, that objective can be very satisfactorily met with a Smith & Wesson M&P, Smith & Wesson Sigma, and/or a Steyr M9-A1 or M40-A1, all of which are in my collection and which I carry from time to time.

Posted by: canovack | July 26, 2013 11:39 AM    Report this comment

I own ed a 1st gen glock 23. liked it but couldn't get used to the trigger. I sold it, haven't owned one since. my current sidearm is a kimber pro=carry.

Posted by: robert b | July 25, 2013 4:43 PM    Report this comment

I have carried a G19 for years, which is the 9mm version of the G23, with same frame. Have both Gen 3 & Gen 4 models and, frankly, don't see a lot of difference between them. They are ugly, strong, reliable and accurate. What more does one need?
D

Posted by: DAve N | July 25, 2013 3:33 PM    Report this comment

I like my G22. I've been told, with some logical evidence, that for both competition & Self-defense the 180 grain slug is a great choice. This allows one to use the "higher mass/lower velocity" ammo with the resulting lower recoil. Lower recoil means faster recovery times and more enjoyable training sessions. The more I enjoy training, the more practice time I put in, and the better I get. I would carry a .45 but do not like the recoil, or the cost of the ammo.

Enough about the ammo. To compare the Glock to the Taurus: Lets face it,- the only reason to buy the Taurus is that it is Cheap. If cost is the deciding factor, do yourself a favor, buy a used Glock ($350-450 for a used Cop Glock). Running the Glock is like driving a cop car (try it, you might like it). It is strong, RELIABLE, accurate and simple enough for even a cop to use! There are fancier cars and fancier guns, but if I am going to bet my life on an affordable semi-auto hand gun: Glock-22 is my full size choice, Kahr PM9 is my subcompact, and Mossburg 500 is my shotgun. I have counted on all of them and never been let down.

Posted by: OregonGreg | July 25, 2013 1:23 PM    Report this comment

I really like my taurus 740. The trigger was awful for the first box of ammo, but great now. It is a wonderful carry pistol.

Posted by: normbwana | July 25, 2013 12:23 PM    Report this comment

As a dedicated "sigophile" for 25+ years, I recognized the utility and reliability of Glocks; but wasn't a fan......until DB Tactical slicked up the action for me and now is my favorite carry pistol. DB also fitted 9mm conversion barrel, 40 OEM replacement and 357 Sig barrels, all by KKM. 10-12 people I know have sent theirs and they're all delighted with results! Likely going to do Gen 4 G35 and G27 with same 3 caliber treatment as 23!

Posted by: ordnance outsellers | July 25, 2013 10:28 AM    Report this comment

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