Gun of the Week

Glock G22 RTF2 40 S&W, $646

The G22 RTF2’s internal workings did not change, but its exterior had a makeover purported to improve the gun’s ergonomics. The Rough Textured Frame Version #2 (RTF2) has more than 4,000 small raised pyramids covering the front, rear, sides, and thumbrests of the frame. We trusted Glock on this point and did not attempt to count them. These 'polymids' are designed to provide additional traction and an enhanced shooting grip.   More...

Bersa Firestorm .380 ACP, $307

Back in April 2006 Gun Tests magazine tested three .380 ACP pistols, one of which was the Walther PPK, as made here in the U.S. under license by Smith & Wesson. They loved the well-built little PPK, even though it had to go back for rework before they gave it a clean bill of health. It had failed in DA shooting, but a stiffer spring gave it the equivalent of their Grade A appraisal. They recently found a gun that looked a lot like the PPK, the FireStorm by Bersa ($307 MSRP), from Argentina. Here’s what they found.   More...

Taurus Raging Bull 444B8 44 Magnum

Eight years ago (February 2000), we tested the Raging Bull model, which was designed to take the pounding of the newest grenade on the block, the .454 Casull. At the time, the Bull was built on a new larger frame that was fit with a heavy 8 3/8-inch barrel. The barrel featured a deep full-length underlug and porting. The cylinder was braced with a second latch on the crane. The grip was also a new design with a shock-absorbing insert along the backstrap. Each of these features were carried over to subsequent chamberings, which today include .454 Casull, .41 Magnum, 500 Magnum and of course the subject of this test, .44 Magnum.   More...

Kimber SIS Custom RL 45 ACP

The SIS Custom RL came with night sights. The rear unit, windage adjustable via drift, was mounted in a dovetail aligning its rear face precisely with the back of the slide for maximum sight radius. Its forward edge presented a vertical surface reaching about 0.2 inches upwards from the top of the slide. This was to provide a catch point on one’s belt or other edge in case the slide needed to be racked without using two hands. Today’s pistols commonly feature a rear sight with a ramped profile front to back. The ramped profile is much less likely to snag clothing than a tall and sharp sight blade. But if the slide must be racked and the support hand is not available, the operator might wish for the sharp edge of the old-style rear sight. Kimber’s SIS-style rear sight meets this need without the worry of hanging up on the inside of a jacket or shirt.   More...

FNH USA FNP45 USG No. 47938 45 ACP, $780

Not all 45 ACP pistols are built to feed from a single-column magazine or be ignited by a full-time single-action trigger. Gun Tests magazine evaluated a pistol that feeds from a double-column magazine and a trigger system that can alternate between offering a double-action first shot and single-action-only operation — FNH USA’s $780 FNP USG pistol.   More...

Smith & Wesson M&P 45 .45 ACP

The M&P45s feature a 4.6-inch barrel with an overall length of 8.0 inches. The M&P45 comes standard with three interchangeable grips, a steel dovetail mount front sight and a steel Novak Lo-Mount carry rear sight. Tritium sights are also available. A universal Picatinny-style equipment rail has been incorporated for tactical lights and lasers. Our polymer pistol had an empty weight of 25.1 ounces. The new frame-mounted ambidextrous thumb safety acts as a passive safety device, allowing the slide to be pulled toward the rear, clearing the firearm without disengaging the safety. Another feature is the lanyard attachment. All M&P45 pistols feature a Zytel polymer frame reinforced with a stainless-steel chassis and a hardened black Melonite-finished stainless-steel barrel and slide and a Dark Earth Brown grip. This is a silly name for a color—Sand would have been fine—but we overlooked it.   More...

FNH-USA FNP-9 USG Flat Dark Earth (FDE) 9mm

This gun performed flawlessly with acceptable accuracy. It was comfortable to fire, with crisp controls, and it comes with three magazines. Two things we did not like: the bulky grip and poor sights. FN missed a chance to provide first-class sights on the new pistol.   More...

Ruger MKIII6 Standard .22 LR

There are several versions of the Ruger MKIII, but we chose one of the plainest, with the 6-inch barrel. This blued Ruger was exceptionally well balanced, something we all noticed right away. We all loved the feel of the grips, too. The grip angle seemed just right for most of us, and the checkered plastic panels were mighty comfortable as well as functional. We’ve handled the 4-inch version of the Ruger Standard in the recent past and it didn’t balance nearly as well for us. The Ruger Standard is the gun that put Sturm, Ruger & Co. on the map. Introduced in 1949 and selling for $37.50 for many long years, it provided the background and basic building blocks for today’s huge Ruger operation. We’re not sure how many Ruger Standards have sold, but the numbers passed the million mark back in 1979. There have been a few changes to the gun over the years, and most changes may be seen as improvements. We found a few items of contention, however. First, the good stuff.   More...

Cabela's Millennium Revolver 45 LC

Getting into Cowboy Action shooting can be an exercise in frustration, considering only the selection of the handguns needed for that lively game. There are hundreds of them to choose from. So Gun Tests magazine chose three likely six-shooters that promise to do everything needed, and do it well. The three are chambered in .45 Long Colt, which they felt offered a lot more than just an historic viewpoint. The big .45 is a versatile caliber in a good revolver, and was their first choice.   More...

Kel-Tec P32PK 32 ACP

When a shooter asks, 'Which is the best gun for deep concealment?', or 'Is there a good self-defense gun out there with limited recoil?', minds often turn to guns chambered for 32 Auto (32 ACP). Many, or most, would wonder about the 32’s power, or lack of same. Gun Tests magazine addressed that concern in one part of a recent test. Beside bench-shooting for accuracy, they also created an action test that focused on what these guns would most likely be used for—that is, rapid fire at little more than contact distance.   More...

Ruger SP101 KSP-3231X .32 H&R Magnum

Gun Tests magazine recently examined a .32 H&R Magnum revolver in response to a fresh interest in the snub-nosed revolver. The Ruger SP101 SP-3231X was chambered for .32 H&R Magnum. However, the six chambers of the SP101 KSP-32731X provides about one-eighth inch of additional space to accommodate .327 Federal Magnum ammunition. This is a new cartridge developed by Federal and Ruger that seats a 0.312-inch diameter bullet atop a taller, stronger case that they measured to be just less than 1.2 inches long.   More...

Ruger SP101 KSP-3231X .32 H&R Magnum

Gun Tests magazine recently examined a .32 H&R Magnum revolver in response to a fresh interest in the snub-nosed revolver. The Ruger SP101 SP-3231X was chambered for .32 H&R Magnum. However, the six chambers of the SP101 KSP-32731X provides about one-eighth inch of additional space to accommodate .327 Federal Magnum ammunition. This is a new cartridge developed by Federal and Ruger that seats a 0.312-inch diameter bullet atop a taller, stronger case that they measured to be just less than 1.2 inches long.   More...

Kahr PM40 .40 S&W

A short while back Gun Tests magazine tested some pretty small 9mm pistols, by Kahr and by Rohrbaugh. They particularly liked the Kahr PM9’s handling qualities, and the fact that it worked well as a back-up pistol. They noted Kahr produces a similar pistol in .40 S&W caliber, called the PM40. They decided it was appropriate to try one, because anyone who liked the PM9 would probably welcome more power in a package nearly as small.   More...

Kel-Tec Sub Rifle 2000 9mm Carbine

Gun Tests magazine tested the Kel-Tec Sub Rifle 2000 9mm Carbine, ($383). Like the similar Hi-Point 995 and Ruger’s PC9 , the Kel-Tec was fed from pistol magazines. However, the Sub Rifle 2000 is a convertible. The Sub Rifle 2000 breaks down along a hinge and lock that divides the gun in half for storage. They wondered if the gun would keep its integrity after repeated openings and closings. Would it prove to be handy, or just a handful of hard luck?   More...

Smith & Wesson M&P #209001 9mm - Gun Tests Pistol of the Year

Our first impression of the $679 S&W M&P 9mm was that it felt extremely comfortable in the hand. It was well balanced, not too heavy—at least without a magazine full of 17 heavy-bullet loads—and was pleasantly devoid of extraneous controls and levers. We note S&W also sells a version with a thumb safety, along with a host of variants in 9mm, 40 S&W, and 45 ACP, and with longer or shorter barrels or grips, and in a variety of colors. One even has a pink grip insert. Our test gun came in a large case with two different grip inserts to make the handle larger or smaller. We liked it as it was, so we left it alone.   More...