September 6, 2011

Fulton Armory Titan FAR-308 308 Winchester

Fulton Armory is a small manufacturer located in Savage, Maryland, known in the competitive shooting market for its reproductions of the M1 Garand, M1 Carbine, and M-14 models. Their AR-15s aren’t chopped liver either: Fulton’s FAR-15 (5.56/223 Rem.) was our gun of the year in 2009. Now the Titan FAR-308 was in our crosshairs. To ensure neutral opinions on this gun, none of our testers had participated in last year’s review of the FAR-15.

We started our examination by un-boxing the Titan to review its contents. No criticism could be made about their gun case, because there wasn’t one; just a foam-lined cardboard box. Within the box came the gun, owner’s manual, and a webbed sling for attaching to sling-looped supplied gun.

Fulton’s owner’s manual was illustrated and relatively straightforward, though not as detailed the book from ArmaLite. One note in the book stuck out: No barrel break-in was required for the Titan.

Moving to the main event, we examined the gun from stem to stern. The first feature noticed was the unique side-cocking module. The dust cover, forward assist, and brass deflector are removed, instead featuring a handle that may be used to work the gun’s action in lieu of the charging handle. All of our testers liked this feature, even a couple of southpaws in the group.

Fulton Armory Titan FAR-308 308 Winchester

Courtesy, Gun Tests

The Titan handled everything we fed it in an easy-to-shoot package. the only gun in our test equipped with a compensator, its reduced recoil led to easier handling and faster follow-up shots. The FAR-308 also turned in the best accuracy, including our only sub-moa average. We can excuse a couple of misfeeds toward the end when the gun was getting dirty, but can’t quite give it an ‘A’ as a result.

The 18.5-inch target-grey stainless-steel barrel was topped with a Bennie Coolie Compensator. Wrapping the barrel was a free-floating vented black-aluminum tube fore end. The FAR-308 also came with a non-adjustable two-stage trigger. An Ergo Pistol Grip was the last option on the rifle, as the stock was of the standard plastic A2 variety with a hard-plastic buttpad. This combination totaled a little bit more than two thousand dollars ($2058). Our testers were in agreement that FAR-308 had the most striking look, "tactical cool" as one of them phrased it.

The Titan tipped our scales as the middleweight of our group, registering 9.3 lbs. While still weighted forward, our testers said the shorter barrel and lighter weight gave the gun better balance and a livelier feel.

Fulton Armory Titan FAR-308 308 Winchester

Courtesy, Gun Tests

All of our testers liked the Fulton Armory Side Cocking module in lieu of a standard charging handle. Despite the elimination of a brass deflector, no spent rounds found their way into contact with the shooter.

Our trips to the range gave the team ample time to access the shooting capabilities of the gun. At the conclusion of the tests, we found that, unlike the Armalite, our two test groups were in complete agreement. All of our testers preferred the Fulton FAR-308 over the competition. The remarks were remarkably similar: "accurate," "balanced," "easy to shoot," and "low recoil." Two of our SWAT team members gave it their highest compliment, stating they would plunk down their own cash to buy Fulton Titan FAR-308.

The empirical data tended to back up the comments, as the Fulton proved to be the most accurate with all three brands of ammo fired through it, including an average the 0.9 inch group size with the Silver State Armory 175-gr. Sierras. The Bennie Coolie Comp did noticeably reduce felt recoil and allow follow-up shots to be performed with relative ease. However, those shooters at each flank of the shooter were well aware where the recoil had gone, getting a palpable jolt of expended gas thrown their way after each shot.

Comments (24)

Sierra Hotel to all you Vietnam Vets! I'm one too. My action was in an F4 Phantom. 20 mm high explosive incendiary (HEI). Now I'm old too, and I need a .308 for defense and attack. I was rescued from Laotian jungle by some bonafide heroes in a Jolly Green and their escort A1Es. I'm looking for a Fulton Armory Phantom .308 with 20" bbl to hold off the coming horde.

Posted by: smilinjack101 | June 19, 2015 6:17 PM    Report this comment

Comment by Comment by: PH/CIB | September 8, 2011

(AR10s (and clones thereof)do not have a forward assist. That was a U.S. Army add on to the M16, making it the M16A1. Interesting rifle though.)
I own an LWRCI REPR AR-10, it has a charging (bolt style) similar to the FAR-308, but on the LH side, and it has a Fwd assist built into the bolt handle. Great rifle, but your going to pay for it. It aslo has a brass deflector, solid rifle.

Posted by: Avejero | February 8, 2012 6:18 AM    Report this comment

My hat's off to my Vietnam veteran brothers, but I served in Beirut in 1983. All anyone remembers is the bombing (if that) but few know about the fighting we were involved in for months. Our problem was that we were in static defensive positions other than when on patrol (patrols were called off during heavy fighting) so when we were given the okay to shoot back, our targets were typically at long range... 600 - 1000 yards plus. The M-16A1 I carried was next to useless and firing crew served weapons required permission from "God" (very high command authority). The M-16A1 was not the weapon to have, the 5.56mm cartridge was not the right cartridge, and that problem has continued to surface again and again in Middle East operations. I'm not a fan of the 6.8SPC, it might be a larger bullet, but the ballistics let it down with 2400 - 2600fps muzzle velocities behind a 115 grain bullet. Again, lack of range and power. Take that 6.8 X 43 and extend that case to 47mm, get the muzzle velocity to 2900fps and you might have something, but in the meantime, 7.62 X 51 is THE cartridge and the AR-10 platform will deliver it with authority. As for carrying more ammo with the 5.56mm, LEARN TO SHOOT and you don't need 27,000 rounds to hit one target. Like CACTI says, any bullet in the right spot works, but getting it there is the job of the marksman, and the cartridge/rifle needs to be able to live up to the skills of the marksman.

Posted by: Cpl Ski USMC | September 12, 2011 8:09 PM    Report this comment

Good for you, cacti! Thanks for your service, and welcome home, brother. I can't argue with a thing you say concerning choices of firearms.
While I leaned toward the M14 in Vietnam, I fully appreciate the light, handy characteristics of the M16s. If I had spent more time on the ground and less time in the air, I would likely have seen the advantage of the M16 over the M14. Fired from a helicopter, the M14 comported itself pretty well, and in one instance I nailed an NVA troop with an M79 grenade launcher, hitting him with the intact HE round.....quite a spectacular reaction on target.

Posted by: canovack | September 10, 2011 11:33 AM    Report this comment

I LIKE GUNS. EACH HAS A PLACE AND PURPOSE. I VALUE RELIABILITY OVER ALL TRAITS IN A WEAPON. CAREER ARMY AND STARTED WTHH BAR, THEN M1, THEM M-14 AND FINALLY M 16-A1. BY TIME I WAS ISSUED MINE IN NAM BETTER CARTRIDGE, CHROME BORE, BOLT AND CLOSED FLASH SURPRESSOR. ONLY TIME IT EVER FAILED TO FIRE WAS WHEN SNIPER SHOT IT IN TWO DEAD CENTER ON BOLT. HIGH MAINTENANCE. CHECKED IT FREQUENTLY AND CARRIED LOTS OF SPARE PARTS. BUFFERS PRONE TO CRACK SO CLOSE EYE ON THEM. I WAS SHOT 4 TIMES WITH AK 47 WHICH REQUIRED TOTAL 13 MONTHS IN HOSPITAL BUT STILL HERE. 13 NVA ON OTHER END OF MY M-16 AIN'T HERE. ANY BULLET PUT IN RIGHT SPOT WORKS.I CARRIED 50 20 ROUND MAGS AND BAG OF LOOSE ROUNDS. WOULDA BEEN PRETTY HEAVY IF .308. EACH WEAPON HAS + AND -. KNOW THEM.THEY ALL WILL WORK. OLD SOLDIER 25TH/4TH ID HELPED THE 5TH SF OUT A BIT.

Posted by: cacti | September 10, 2011 11:14 AM    Report this comment

Gotcha loud and clear Markbo. Roger the cost factor.....My DPMS LR308 cost about $1050.00 and it handles and shoots great. And.....it isn't that much of a load to tote either. My SOCOM16 and SIG556 feel pretty much the same as my LR308, whether slung, at the ready, or in firing position.

Posted by: canovack | September 9, 2011 8:24 PM    Report this comment

what is delivery time from Credit Card hit to delivery date? How many mags come with the weapon? How much are additional mags? Are they available?
What about any spare parts? Are spare parts interchangeable with say a Armalight, or DPMS, or ??

Posted by: Cava3r4 | September 9, 2011 1:15 PM    Report this comment

As a 4th Infantry Division Vietnam Vet, I too gravitated toward the 7.62x51mm cartridge and the M14 rifle. A while back, I was able to purchase a Springfield SOCOM 16 which is essentially a short barreled M1A. It's a great little "go to" rifle. Out of nostalgia, I also have a number of AR platforms in 5.56x45mm, but one of my favorites is my DPMS LR308. It's a bit heavier than the other ARs in my collection, but it certainly can reach out there very nicely. So.....I have two choices that I can turn to in 7.62x51mm, but wait..... I just recently came into possession of a Ruger Gunsite Scout, in .308 of course, and it is a real pleasing piece too. At any rate, I have finally relegated my Saiga .308 to the trunk of my car as a knock about, while the other pieces, to include my Savage M99 in .308, occupy cozy little nooks in my safes. It is safe to say that I really like caliber .308/7.62x51mm.....a lot.

Posted by: canovack | September 8, 2011 7:48 PM    Report this comment

Although the AR platform has a slight edge on the M1A/M14 in the accuracy department, I elected to purchase my AR-10 (DPMS LR-308 20" HBAR) because of the price difference. If I was going to spend two grand on a semi-auto 7.62, I would buy the M1A. I did spend one grand on my DPMS, added a free float tube and muzzle brake to it for another $150, and I get the same accuracy as noted in the article. I know that Fulton Armory does some fine work but I can't justify the cost. I'm the guy that buys a Savage model 10 for $650 that is just as accurate or more accurate than a $4000 custom rifle. Spending money on a rifle is just like shooting it... a well placed dollar is just as deadly as a big spender.

Posted by: Cpl Ski USMC | September 8, 2011 7:32 PM    Report this comment

You keep ignoring the KEL-TEC bull pup, etc. The PRICE of a rifle does not reflect the quality in today's world. ANYONE can build a good EXPENSIVE rifle, the challenge is to build an accurate, cheap, reliable, light rifle!!!!!

Posted by: longarm45 | September 8, 2011 6:48 PM    Report this comment

AR10s (and clones thereof)do not have a forward assist. That was a U.S. Army add on to the M16, making it the M16A1. Interesting rifle though.

Posted by: ZG47 | September 8, 2011 4:51 PM    Report this comment

Nice but as a USMC Nam vet, I prefer the M14. It is solid and reliable. I never had a mis-feed or problem with mine. Compared to the M14, I hated the M16 Plastic Toy.

Posted by: E. GEORGE B | September 8, 2011 12:17 PM    Report this comment

I was really interested until I read the stock is the typical plastic (toy) stock, for this money I'll look around

Posted by: Sunaj | September 8, 2011 11:13 AM    Report this comment

They have 4 models.

FAR-308 Phantom - MSRP $1,649.95
FAR-308 Phantom LTE - MSRP $1,699.95
FAR-308 Liberator - MSRP $1,749.95
FAR-308 Liberator LTE - MSRP $1,799.95

Posted by: njcountyofficer | September 8, 2011 10:27 AM    Report this comment

Just a bit to much for the Old Bears pocket book and like other Nam vets the M14 was ten times better then the metel toy M16. I hated having to us 2 30rnd mags to cut down the bush the VC was hiding behind when 1 rnd from the good old 14 and bad guy gone.
God Bless America and Our Troops Past Present and Future.
Keeping to My Oath Locked Loaded and Keeping My Powder Dry.
Get the US Out of the UN and the UN Out of the US.

Posted by: bear1 | September 7, 2011 11:51 PM    Report this comment

made some remarks about the M1A by Fulton and mentioned I had bought the Titan. Interesting because mine has a charging handle on it. Also the 22" barrel but with the Cooley muzzle break. I saw your article in 2000 and it shows the cocking lever also. Guess I just got a one-off, but when ordered from FAR themself, there was no option for cocking levers. Thay all came with charging handles. It likes just about anything I have run through it, although most is hunting or match, no surplus and of course my reloads.

Posted by: trk3 | June 12, 2011 7:43 AM    Report this comment

Fulton Arrmory is indeed impressive. I ordered a custom-built AR-15 upper in .223... 20" heavy barrel, free-floated rail handguard, Phantom flash suppressor, etc. I put it on top of a lower from another AR-15. Long story short, after just 60 rounds of (not needed) break-in, the Fulton Armory upper put 3 rounds in the same hole at 50 yards without me really trying. Sight was an unmagnified holosight, and I was shooting from a bench with a front support only. Ammo was Lake City SS109. It's my best-shooting rifle ever. If you want to be MORE than satisfied with your rifle, buy from Fulton Armory. Next time I want or need a rifle, that's where I'm going.

Posted by: jamraqui | November 14, 2009 7:52 PM    Report this comment

Just a note: Fulton has done some Garand work for myself an some other various work for friends and some acquaintences at My Gun Club.
Myself and all of them to a man have said "If it's done by Fulton it's done right!"

Posted by: timothy c | November 13, 2009 2:52 PM    Report this comment

I own a Norinco M14 which I sent to Fulton Armory several years ago for their Chinese M14 upgrade. I can vouch for the excellent work and attention to detail they put into their rifles. It's a beautiful rifle and very accurate with any .308 I feed it with no FTF's yet, and every time I take it to the range, it becomes the center of attention. From what I can read about the Titan, it would make a great companion to my M14.

Posted by: lfdavis | November 12, 2009 10:41 PM    Report this comment

Dear Santa...

Posted by: lfdavis | November 12, 2009 10:25 PM    Report this comment

Price?

Posted by: KURT L. H | November 12, 2009 6:51 PM    Report this comment

"had a couple of misfeeds when dirty"

The new stainless steel mags with CrSi springs have corrected that.

Regards,

Walt

Posted by: wjkuleck | November 12, 2009 4:04 PM    Report this comment

"no mention was made as to its manufacture"

Fulton Armory, sir.

Regards,

Walt

Posted by: wjkuleck | November 12, 2009 2:48 PM    Report this comment

Being a Vietnam Vet I preferred the M-14 over the M-16. If I were to purchase a fighting rifle I would want it to be a 7.62/308. But $2,058 is a lot of money to spend for a rifle especially one which had a couple of misfeeds when dirty.

I assume the price did not include the scope we see mounted and no mention was made as to its manufacture.

Posted by: Bill W | November 12, 2009 11:32 AM    Report this comment

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