November 30, 2009

Magnum Research BFR 22H10 .22 Hornet

The BFR 22H10, code name Little Max in the Magnum Research brochure, is a single action only gun. To load the BFR you first open the loading gate. No manipulation of the hammer is needed to free the cylinder. Much like the Ruger single-action revolvers, the hammer stays safely in a down position.

Each cylinder clicks into position, letting you know it is properly indexed for loading. Firing involves pulling the hammer all the way back (there is no half cock or other intermediate position) and pressing the trigger. To unload, simply open the gate, line up the chambers and push out the empty cases by sliding back the ejector rod. There is a lot of meat between chambers since only six small holes are drilled into cylinder. In fact, it was our observation that it shot better when hot. Revolvers, especially ones with a lot of steel between chambers, can stand heat better than most rifles. Revolver barrels are shorter and more rigid.

Courtesy, Gun Tests

Courtesy, Gun Tests

Our experience firing the BFR showed that a 35-grain Hornady VMax load was the ticket for accuracy, shooting average group sizes of just 0.6 inch at 25 yards. The BFR averaged groups of 1.4 inches at 50 yards with this round.

Also the greatest amount of heat is expended inside the chambers, which are not connected to the barrel.

Oddly, the single-action BFR was easier to fire standing. While 71 ounces is not light, we could get away with shooting the gun unsupported on a limited basis. The BFR also comes with a rubber grip by Hogue, (800) GET GRIP, which is highly functional, but for use with the loud but pleasant recoil of the .22 Hornet, we might order the optional Hogue wood grips of Pau Ferro or Goncalo Alves.

Courtesy, Gun Tests

Courtesy, Gun Tests

No manipulation of the hammer is needed to free the cylinder. Each cylinder clicks into position, letting you know it is properly indexed. position) and pressing the trigger. To unload, simply open the gate, line up the chambers and push out the empty cases.

Now, a total of nine handloads are listed by Accurate, with bullet weights ranging from 40 to 50 grains at velocities of 1,780 to 2,397 fps. But our experience firing the BFR showed us that a lighter bullet of a mere 35 grains (commercially loaded by Hornady) was the ticket for accuracy. It excelled in the BFR at 25 yards, with an average group size of just 0.6 inch.

The supplied front sight is an orange serrated ramp set upon a stanchion, not only because extra height is needed, but because the thick barrel is round and this platform is necessary to seat the blade. The BFR averaged groups of 1.4 inches at 50 yards with this round.

Comments (4)

what about the 454 Casul or the 45-70

Posted by: potshot | December 5, 2009 9:01 PM    Report this comment

There was a gunsmith in the Missouri Ozarks in the late seventies that was converting Smiths to the K hornet with good results. This would be a natural for that round. He claimed the straight case caused less trouble with hot loads. Shot one and loved it but couldn't afford it at the time. This would be great for a varmint gun over a call.

Posted by: olderndirtcop | December 3, 2009 1:58 PM    Report this comment

In the name of economy I'll have a 22 magnum, thank you. I hope you didn't slobber all over the man's gun.

Posted by: dirt | December 3, 2009 1:16 PM    Report this comment

Fascinating piece of workmanship. If I could figure out what I would use it for with my firearm habits it would be BOUGHT!!! Thank-you for the great profile!!! Peter J. Stanford

Posted by: BIMMER | December 3, 2009 1:02 PM    Report this comment

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