April 4, 2011

Remington Makes Centennial and High Grade 1911 R1s

(GunReports.com) -- In recognition of the 100th anniversary of the Model 1911 design, E-RPC is offering two new Remington Model 1911 R1 handguns. The Remington Model 1911 R1 Centennial and the Centennial-Limited Edition commemorate this great pistol design and Remington's return to handgun manufacturing.

The Remington Model 1911 R1 Centennial is built with the same precision-engineered slide and frame as the Model 1911 R1 but with special Centennial engravings on the slide; a special Centennial serial number range; a dovetailed brass bead front sight and black serrated rear sight and custom grip panels that feature Remington medallions. Each pistol is shipped with two, seven-round, anti-friction magazines and Remington’s 1911 R1 Multi-Tool.

The Model 1911 R1 Centennial-Limited Edition features an engraved slide with gold banner, custom charcoal blued finish and a 24-karat-gold front sight. The grip panels are smooth, exhibition grade walnut. Each Remington Model 1911 R1 Centennial-Limited Edition Pistol is hand assembled and comes in a custom wood presentation case.


The 1911 R1 Centennial, MSRP $1250, Order #96340 (above), and the 1911 R1 Centennial-Limited Edition Order #96341, MSRP $2250, are semi-auto .45 ACPs with 7-round magazines. They have 5-inch stainless match-grade barrels with 1-16 LH rifling twist rates. Both are 8½ inches in overall length and stand 5½ inches tall. Both weigh 38.5 ounces. The Centennial's grip material is rosewood laminate, while the Limited's grip is exhibition grade walnut. Both have fixed rear sights with brass-bead front sights. Trigger pulls on both range from 3.5 to 5 pounds.

The first 1911 handgun manufactured by Remington was delivered during World War I. Remington once again is manufacturing the 1911 for E-RPC, Remington’s affiliated company, and to be offering these two anniversary models.

Comments (11)

I must have gotten a good one also, as this one is flawless and I am as picky a person regarding firearms that you will ever meet. Accurate than most 1911's I've ever fired. The internals are exeptionally smooth and refined. Going by this one, I would recommend it highly>

Posted by: mmargotta | April 10, 2011 2:30 PM    Report this comment

I must have gotten a good one also, as this one is flawless and I am as picky a person regarding firearms that you will ever meet. Accurate than most 1911's I've ever fired. The internals are exeptionally smooth and refined. Going by this one, I would recommend it highly>

Posted by: mmargotta | April 10, 2011 2:27 PM    Report this comment

I've been a licensed FFL holder for 24 years and I'm disapointed with Remington as well. For starters, I stopped by an official Remington staffed booth at a local trade show (for licensed dealers only) and I knew more about this pistol than their so called expert. When I asked the fellow about their 1911, he claimed that the frame was milled from forged steel when it fact the frame is investment cast. Granted I do quite a bit of reading just to stay up to speed with what is going on in firearms industry but a factory employed guy that is representing their company should know more than me. I do have to give this guy credit when he didn't try to tell me they manufactured 1911's during WWII. Haven't shot one of these but the finish on the trade show example I handled was poor at best. The photos Remington uses to promote this pistol make the finish look way better than what it is in person. This might be a fine shooting firearm but I expect way more from a company like Remington.

Posted by: northstargoods.com | April 10, 2011 11:57 AM    Report this comment

Don,t buy this overpriced junk! Get a Tauras 1911, all the features of the overpriced crap, and shoots like butter!

Posted by: blogme | April 10, 2011 6:05 AM    Report this comment

For Glenn A, Remington-UMC made 1911s during WW1, and that is Remington. As for Remington-Rand, it was Remington's typewriter company which was sold off long before WW2 production of the 1911-A1. But it was at one time, part of the Remington Company, so it is related to Remington.

Posted by: foxhole-49 | April 10, 2011 12:28 AM    Report this comment

For Glenn A, Remington-UMC made 1911s during WW1, and that is Remington. As for Remington-Rand, it was Remington's typewriter company which was sold off long before WW2 production of the 1911-A1. But it was at one time, part of the Remington Company, so it is related to Remington.

Posted by: foxhole-49 | April 10, 2011 12:27 AM    Report this comment

I haven't seen one of these new Remingtons so I can't speak for their quality. I do, however own one of the first R1's to become available in our area when they came out, and I have nothing but praise for it. Good fit and finish, nice trigger, wonderful sights...I'm well pleased. I really have nothing to compare it to other than a Commander that I carried as a duty weapon years ago, but I do know that the R1 would be my personal choice of the two if the agency that I'm with now allowed us to carry personal weapons. I guess that I got lucky and got a good 'un...!

Posted by: pd2sp2fed | April 7, 2011 5:00 PM    Report this comment

I was really discouraged to see the poor quality of one of the new remingtons... the fit and finish of the one I held was really bad... I couldn't believe it was actually for sale.. I told the salesperson to box it back up and send it back as defective... poor slide fit, visible rust on areas where parkerizing did not cover.. I was amaszed to see a new gun rusty in the box...& less than 2 months old..

Posted by: retired87068 | April 7, 2011 4:24 PM    Report this comment

I don't know if the linkage of the Remington family tree to WWI production is true or false, but I do know that this pistol IS American Made, and Remington has had this series of 1911's in the public's hands since late last year, so I don't agree that this is a "1911-2011 bandwagon" project. Shooters that I've talked to seem to like the gun, and I think this "base" Centennial version gun has a lot more features for the money than the Colt 2011 Anniv Level 3 gun. The Colt is basically their WWI series reproduction, with NO engraving, just one addition to the "Model of 1911" roll mark to make it read "Model of 1911-2011". That's ok if that's what you want in a 100 year anniversary model, but I happen to like the engraved slide of the Remington and their American Made gun is about the same price as the American Made Colt, so I don't think it's a "pure profit margin gun".

Posted by: pbtexan | April 7, 2011 4:22 PM    Report this comment

True and for that kind of money I could get a Les Baer.

Posted by: buckheart | April 7, 2011 3:56 PM    Report this comment

What a joke! Remington isn't even REMOTELY related to Remington-Rand which produced 1911's for the US Gov't. Today's Remington doesn't even make a pistol, other than this one which was an obvious attempt at jumping on the 1911-2011 bandwagon to produce an overpriced, underfeatured, "centennial" edition as a pure profit-margin gun. Get your act together, Remington.

Posted by: KCSHOOTER | April 7, 2011 1:14 PM    Report this comment

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