Gun Report

I. Hollis & Sons 12 Gauge

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With its Prince-of-Wales grip, Greener crossbolt and proof for 1.25-ounce shot, the Hollis was clearly a gun for "wildfowling." Today, it is useful for longer-range shooting of game birds where lead shot is still legal. It was deadly on clays once we got used to its tight, but very even, patterns. Despite its greater weight, thisgun was just as lively as the Ruger.

I. Hollis & Sons 12 Gauge

Gun Details

Manufacturer
Model Name
Model Number
Home Defense
Hunting
Competition
Price
Caliber/Gauge
Caliber Plus Cartridge
Capacity
Weight Unloaded
Warranty
Drop at Front Comb
Drop at Back Comb
Length of Pull
Action Type
Action Finish
Barrel Finish
Sights
Trigger Pull Weight

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A few touches of engraving keep the action from looking plain now that its colors have faded. The owner reblued the barrels, added touches of engraving here and there, and repaired it as needed. These little things, along with the tight chokes, prevented our recommending such a gun to the average buyer.
This old boxlock gun was made in the first quarter of the 20th Century, as well as its owner — a collector of English doubles — could determine. The proof marks indicate manufacture after 1904. This gun had a Greener crossbolt, no ejectors, and was choked full and full. It was not a game gun, but what is called a “wildfowling” gun. It weighed 7 pounds 4 ounces, enough to easily handle the proof-stamped 1.25-ounce charge, which its owner used to very good effect some years back, when lead shot was legal for duck shooting. Despite its weight, the Hollis balanced very well, and felt much more alive than the lighter Ruger. It was responsive, though by no means a top-name gun.
The crossbolt requires a big chunk of steel between the 2.75-inch chambers. But it's still tight and fully useful.
We found the Hollis' action to be solid, clean, & utilitarian. Note the unbushed pins.

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