Gun Report

Remington R-25 308 Win./7.62 NATO

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The Remington R-25’s cool, but flaking, Mossy Oak coating couldn’t camouflage a gun with mediocre accuracy—when we could get it to shoot. We had failures to fire with all three ammo brands in the test, but we had the most trouble with 175-grain rounds with hard military primers.

Remington R-25 308 Win./7.62 NATO

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Home Defense
Hunting
Recreational
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The dealbreaker on the R-25 was the gun’s large number of misfires using the 175-grain Silver State loads. Soft-striking the primer (like on the unfired round shown at right), the R-25 would not complete a five-round group without a failure to fire (FTF). We collected 13 FTF rounds of 175-grain loads, three FTFs with Silver State 168-grain rounds, and one FTF with Federal 150-grain rounds. Silver State informed us that only the 175-grain rounds use a harder military primer, which might explain some of the Remington’s malfunctions. However, the other guns experienced no failures with any ammo. Remington’s customer service department said the bolt might need to be cleaned or lubricated, or a stronger spring installed, and such work would be covered under warranty.

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