December 2018

Firing Line

What About the 10mm Upper?

Let me start by asking, why not compare Olympic’s 10mm AR conversion instead of a 5.7x28 upper? When you ask, 'Is a $700 5.7x28 Upper a Good AR Buy?', I think, 'Is the 5.7x28 better at anything than a 223 or 22 Hornet?' My own answer is a resounding 'Nope!' If I want a small-caliber rifle bullet with lots of speed or penetration, the 223/5.56 seems more than adequate. If I need a smaller caliber than the 223, I can buy a complete 77-22 Hornet for less than the AR upper and feed it less expensive 22 Hornet ammo. The 5.7x28 may be of some value in a handgun, I’ve never found myself in a situation to ponder that question and would speculate that I never will. If I were looking for a personal-defense rifle less powerful than the 223, I think the 10mm is a good start, as I’ve determined that the 9mm makes a fine pocket-pistol caliber but a poor rifle.   More...

How to Find a Good AR-15 Rifle

I am in the market for an AR-15. I haven’t shot an M16 since boot camp in Fort Polk, Louisiana, in 1974. I’ve been a cop for 25 years and never really wanted, or needed, a rifle during that time. Now that I’m semi-retired, I am looking and I need some straight talk and help. I want a good weapon, but there are so many manufacturers and options, I’m confused as hell. Because I was never in the war, I never experienced malfunctions. We always cleaned and over-lubed our Colts. My choice so far is a chrome-lined barrel, bore and bolt. Am I correct?   More...

GSG Fans Laud Their Pistols

I was surprised when I read about the GSG 1911. Mine has become one of my favorite handguns because it has never malfunctioned. It also seems to prefer economy ammo, particularly Winchester Wildcat. Mine came from Acme Gun Store in Seymour, Indiana, for less than $350 and will outshoot several guns that cost a lot more. Also, it is already threaded for a suppressor. I hope your sample comes back and functions as well as mine does. I’m watching for your follow-up on this gun. Your magazine is the only one I subscribe to, and I share it every month with my “coffee-drinking” friends. The management at McDonalds would be surprised if they knew what handguns were examined in their dining room. Keep up the good work on a great magazine.   More...

Scout Rifle Questions Answered

I read the May issue of Gun Tests and it was excellent as usual. I have a question regarding the Scout rifle test. I’ve read where the magazine on the Ruger Gunsite Scout was made by Accuracy International. I did not read this in the article, so my question is: Have you heard or read the same thing? If this is the case, my next question would be to Ruger: Why use a magazine by Accuracy International, which is a excellent firearms manufacturer, instead of a M-14 mag, or an Armalite mag, DPMS mag, or an FN FAL mag? I figure that using an alternate mag maker would possibly correct the difficult feeding problem you encountered during the test with the Ruger.   More...

Praise for Older-Gun Evaluations

Your decision to run articles on older guns is great. I’m sure you hear about what you do wrong, but I wanted to cheer you on in this area. I just renewed my subscription because of it. I couldn’t care less about the latest AK-whatever, although I support your right to have whatever you like. The writers of the Second Amendment meant for you to have any gun the government owned, since its purpose was to protect you from the government, but that’s another story.   More...

What? What’d You Say? What?

Like many others, this really excellent article refers to the presumed suitability of the shotgun for home defense, particularly the 12 gauge. Frankly, unless the defenders all have donned appropriate ear protection, the shotgun’s blast (especially 28 gauge and up) probably will 'take out' their hearing and, of course, permanently disable any unfortunate pets. Therefore, not only is the pistol-caliber carbine more appropriate, the best would be subsonic, especially a 45 like those covered, equipped with a silencer. An alternative would be a suitable sidearm, also silencer-equipped. For home defense, it’s worthwhile to go through the Federal hoops to obtain a silencer or silenced-firearm.   More...

Praise for CTC’s Laser Grips

Just a follow up to this article: While all the test units fared well, I have to tell you and your readers about a quality company, Crimson Trace (CTC). About a year back I was able to purchase a Kimber custom pistol, my first. As many know, retired LEOs don’t exactly have money flowing in, so it was many years before I came across a nice quality used pistol for the right price. When I finally did, I jumped at the opportunity to buy it — and it came with CTC laser grips already on it. I’m guessing the Kimber was a couple of years old before I bought it, and now I have had it over a year.   More...

On the Mark V: Mag Box Floats

I enjoyed your article on our rifles in your April issue. I’m always interested in other people’s views on our products. I’d like to clear up a technical issue. You mentioned the magazine box in the MkV moved in the stock when the floorplate was open. That is by design. In most bolt-action rifles, the magazine feed lips are built into the receiver, so there will be different receivers within the same model line to handle different-size cartridges. The magazine box is just a box holding the cartridges, and its relationship to the receiver is not critical. Our Vanguard model is a good example of this design. In the MkV, we use the same receiver for all our rifles, no matter the cartridge size.   More...

Adding an Optic to the WASR-10

My WASR-10 does not have the muzzle brake. It won’t mount a bayonet since a part of the lug is ground off. The iron sights were a real challenge since, when aligned, there was no white space on either side of the front post. I filed a V groove in the rear sight so I could see and use the sights. Three of us shot 14-inch groups at 50 yards, but it was really a lot of fun to shoot. I have the scope mount and will try shooting with it. Hopefully, I can tighten up the groups with a scope.   More...

.410 Loads: Keep the Change

Loved the great article on .410 shotshell loads. You were intrigued by the “defense discs” of the Winchester PDX1 shell and mentioned the Old West folklore of a shotgun load composed of a roll of dimes. There is a great example of this legend in Sam Peckinpah’s 1973 film, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. In the film, Kris Kristofferson’s character (Billy the Kid) uses a double-barrel coach gun loaded with thin dimes to great effect against a brutal enemy. After dispatching his foe he remarks, “Keep the change, BOB.” Thank you for the excellent magazine.   More...

Will Ammo Become Currency?

Reader Gage assesses the current state of firearms and ammunition sales and sees mainline cartridges turning into investments. And lots of mail on what we do after Newtown.   More...

Eclipse Holster Safety Advice

Great article on the Kimber Eclipse. I have a Kimber Stainless Gold Match II which I love, but there is a serious consideration when picking a holster for these guns for personal defense. The problem is related to the extended thumb safety on both of these models. I chose the Bianchi Model 5 “Black Widow” holster, but soon realized it was not compatible. The brown plastic button on the back of the snap (male side) is rounded, and every time you move to close the snap, you slide the thumb safety to the Fire position. The button slides right over the top of the safety, resulting in a carry condition of “cocked, UNlocked, and Unsafe.”   More...

Firelapping Barrels Revisited

Although the Cabela’s 45 groups got smaller, they were not the tiny ones I had seen others achieve via this process. I had seen a fellow writer do far better and also the examples provided by Beartooth had been better. Hence my disappointment. I have since learned there are limits to what can be achieved depending on things like fitting of the cylinder to the gun, etc. Next, I apparently didn’t make it sufficiently clear that the felt slugging resistance can come from many things, such as barrel roughness as well as cramping from later machining processes. Also, the tighness can come from lead or metal fouling left in the bore before slugging, and that’s why the bore must be absolutely clean before checking it. The Beartooth manual details exactly what and how the lead slugs accomplish removal of metal down the bore, not just at the leade. I suggest you get that manual and read it.   More...

Defense of the Auto Ord G.I. 45

Reader Bob has a ‘10-ring’ rattletrap AO pistol that looks like it was beaten on a rock. Still shoots great. Also, we list an online source for the S&W lubricant, but supplies are likely short.   More...

Gun-Buying 2012: We Want It All

The rock band Queen has a song entitled, “I Want It All.” That is the attitude that many people are taking toward a potential assault weapons ban. I have seen an individual buy a shopping cart full of magazines. I asked him if he has a rifle for them, and he told me no, but he is buying them as an investment. I have seen a gentleman with his arms full of 5.56 NATO 20-round ammunition boxes, about 50. I guess he did not have the time or sense to get a shopping cart or basket. I said, “You have a lot of ammo.” He replies, “Yes, I do.” I asked him if he got it all? He replied, “Yes, I got it all!” He added that he was going to another store to look for more, and if he found it, he was going to buy all that, too. I asked him which store, and he said he would not tell me, because I might beat him there.   More...