November 3, 2008

Beretta 92FS

Taking into account its production as a military weapon (the M9), this pistol is one of the largest selling sidearms in history. The 92FS and the other guns are traditional double actions. The first shot is double action; subsequent shots are single action. The hammer can be lowered safely using the decocking lever found on both the right and left side of the slide. This lever will then stay down and, acting as a safety, disconnect the trigger. Raising the lever returns the gun to double action.

At least two features make the Beretta 92 pistols unique. One is that the slide exposes most of the barrel, and the other is that lockup is almost entirely achieved from underneath the chamber. A barrel-mounted falling locking block accomplishes lockup. This adds to the simplicity of field-stripping. On the left side of the frame is a button that when pushed allows the catch on the other side of the frame to rotate and release the slide. There is no slide stop to remove. Once removed, the top end breaks down to slide, barrel with locking block attached, and the recoil spring with the guide rod. The recoil spring is a single-filament coil, and the guide rod is polymer. This combination allows this pistol to be reliable with low slide mass and reduced recoil.

The energy expended to operate the locking block also contributes to a reduction of felt recoil, as does the full-sized frame, which contributes excellent ergonomics. The frame is alloy, with Beretta’s Bruniton finish. Both the Beretta and SIGArms pistols in this test weighed in at 34 ounces. The all-steel Magnum Research pistol, although similar in overall size, weighed 6 ounces more.

Courtesy, Gun Tests

Courtesy, Gun Tests

This time-tested design did not disappoint us. We especially liked this gun because it is reasonably priced, and there are aftermarket solutions to refine it to match-grade performance.

To test the performance of each of our pistols, we set up a test apart from our usual benchrest session. We fired pairs of shots from 7 yards at a NRA D-1 target, which is used in Action Pistol (Bianchi Cup) and resembles its nickname, the tombstone. It is fashioned from corrugated cardboard showing concentric circles starting with a 4-inch X-ring. Next is an 8-inch ring, referred to as the 10-ring, and a 10-inch ring, which scores 8 points. Aiming at the X-ring we started firing double action, and followed as quickly and as accurately as we could with a second shot single action. This was repeated 15 times. We used a Competitive Edge Dynamics timer to record the splits, or time between shots. This device ($134.50 from Brownells, 800-741-0015) sounds a start signal and then displays elapsed time each time its internal microphone hears a shot. Split times are also displayed.

We then looked at the size of the groups to give us a picture of the each gun’s willingness to transfer from DA to SA and maintain control. The Beretta’s stock double-action trigger was smooth but heavy at 12.5 pounds. Single action was heavy as well, requiring 7.5 pounds of pressure. This would rate as being at the high end of the average weight trigger found on most stock 1911 semi-automatic pistols.

Courtesy, Gun Tests

Courtesy, Gun Tests

Leave the decocker in the down position and the trigger is disconnected. Raise it to return to double action.

The Beretta was the first test pistol of the day at the 7-yard line, and we filled it with Federal’s 124-grain Expanding Full Metal Jacket ammunition. This round produced an average velocity of 1095 fps from our 92FS. The P226 fired this round at 1089 fps, and the Magnum Research Desert Eagle was fastest with an average velocity of 1120 fps. In the Beretta’s Action test, the time between shots ranged from 0.71 to 0.51 seconds, for an average of 0.61 seconds. Through 15 strings of fire, we landed 14 X-ring hits, 15 10-ring hits and one 8-ring hit. Our 30-shot group measured 5.9 inches in diameter, tops for our roster of 9mm test guns.

The second day of tests featured all four guns being tested from a sandbag rest at a distance of 25 yards. We fired two loads from Black Hills, a new manufactured (red box) 115-grain +P round, and a remanufactured (blue box) 124-grain FMJ round. We also tried a frangible, the 60-grain Defender from MagSafe. Reliability throughout our tests was 100 percent. We found that the Beretta liked the Black Hills 115-grain JHP-EXP the best, shooting groups that consistently measured approximately 2.5 inches center to center.

Comments (40)

cuanto me cuesta beretta m 93 r ist italiana con el envio por HDL MY CEL, 96616328

Posted by: 000000000 | July 9, 2010 7:09 PM    Report this comment

cuanto me cuesta beretta m 93 r ist italiana con el envio por HDL MY CEL, 96616328

Posted by: 000000000 | July 9, 2010 7:09 PM    Report this comment

cuanto me cuesta beretta m 93 r ist italiana con el envio por HDL MY CEL, 96616328

Posted by: 000000000 | July 9, 2010 7:09 PM    Report this comment

I've gotta say that #1, The U.S.A. will and always have kicked ass and taken names, no matter which weapon was employed at any time including bayonets! Now, I've been a real happy camper since purchasing my 1st Beretta almost a year ago. I decided on the PX4 Storm in .40cal as a happy medium between a 9 and a .45acp. Out of the cheap blue case that it came in, it performed flawlessly right down to the task of reloading the two clips that were included. Breakdown, cleanup, re-assembly were all very straightforward tasks with no causes for concern, that is, until now. It reached it's 3,000rnd milestone about two weeks ago pretty much effortlessly but there's a BIG PROBLEM I, along with my other L.E. buds and acquaintences are noticing as a continuosly eroding occuring at the entry tip of the barrel that has established a now noticible gouge and it's right below the damn ejection port which is justifiable cause for concern and I've made the decision to return this weapon back to the Beretta dealer whom I bought from brand new. Two questions here guys...I've never had a reason to formally and outright "return" a firearm and wonder if it can be done with me being refund the money I paid and maybe minus a restocking fee. Question #2 fellas is this, of the 3,000 rounds that haVE been put through this superior weapon, not one round has been any other brand but FEDERAL so I'm confident in ruling out the possibility od bad ammo damage. If you are looking at the PX4 from the topside (looking down on it), the damage can been seen, of course with the action open, if one examained the right corner of the entry end (OR feed point) of the barrel very closely. Any theories, thoughts or criticisms would help me in the decision making process the I might have to regrettably make.

Posted by: yarddogg | February 25, 2010 3:58 AM    Report this comment

I've gotta say that #1, The U.S.A. will and always have kicked ass and taken names, no matter which weapon was employed at any time including bayonets! Now, I've been a real happy camper since purchasing my 1st Beretta almost a year ago. I decided on the PX4 Storm in .40cal as a happy medium between a 9 and a .45acp. Out of the cheap blue case that it came in, it performed flawlessly right down to the task of reloading the two clips that were included. Breakdown, cleanup, re-assembly were all very straightforward tasks with no causes for concern, that is, until now. It reached it's 3,000rnd milestone about two weeks ago pretty much effortlessly but there's a BIG PROBLEM I, along with my other L.E. buds and acquaintences are noticing as a continuosly eroding occuring at the entry tip of the barrel that has established a now noticible gouge and it's right below the damn ejection port which is justifiable cause for concern and I've made the decision to return this weapon back to the Beretta dealer whom I bought from brand new. Two questions here guys...I've never had a reason to formally and outright "return" a firearm and wonder if it can be done with me being refund the money I paid and maybe minus a restocking fee. Question #2 fellas is this, of the 3,000 rounds that haVE been put through this superior weapon, not one round has been any other brand but FEDERAL so I'm confident in ruling out the possibility od bad ammo damage. If you are looking at the PX4 from the topside (looking down on it), the damage can been seen, of course with the action open, if one examained the right corner of the entry end (OR feed point) of the barrel very closely. Any theories, thoughts or criticisms would help me in the decision making process the I might have to regrettably make.

Posted by: yarddogg | February 25, 2010 3:57 AM    Report this comment

I've gotta say that #1, The U.S.A. will and always have kicked ass and taken names, no matter which weapon was employed at any time including bayonets! Now, I've been a real happy camper since purchasing my 1st Beretta almost a year ago. I decided on the PX4 Storm in .40cal as a happy medium between a 9 and a .45acp. Out of the cheap blue case that it came in, it performed flawlessly right down to the task of reloading the two clips that were included. Breakdown, cleanup, re-assembly were all very straightforward tasks with no causes for concern, that is, until now. It reached it's 3,000rnd milestone about two weeks ago pretty much effortlessly but there's a BIG PROBLEM I, along with my other L.E. buds and acquaintences are noticing as a continuosly eroding occuring at the entry tip of the barrel that has established a now noticible gouge and it's right below the damn ejection port which is justifiable cause for concern and I've made the decision to return this weapon back to the Beretta dealer whom I bought from brand new. Two questions here guys...I've never had a reason to formally and outright "return" a firearm and wonder if it can be done with me being refund the money I paid and maybe minus a restocking fee. Question #2 fellas is this, of the 3,000 rounds that haVE been put through this superior weapon, not one round has been any other brand but FEDERAL so I'm confident in ruling out the possibility od bad ammo damage. If you are looking at the PX4 from the topside (looking down on it), the damage can been seen, of course with the action open, if one examained the right corner of the entry end (OR feed point) of the barrel very closely. Any theories, thoughts or criticisms would help me in the decision making process the I might have to regrettably make.

Posted by: yarddogg | February 25, 2010 3:55 AM    Report this comment

I carried and used the 92FS in competition for years. I found that the gun was uncomfortable as hell to carry in the summer after a while. The one main problem that I had with the gun was that when I was drawing the weapon I would hit the decocker delaying my first shot

Posted by: smittyj | May 26, 2009 9:03 PM    Report this comment

I have a "poor man's Beretta" the Taurus PT-92AF of Brazil made on he old Beretta factory there that I feel is a far superior gun. First I have not heard of a Taurus slide coming apart, second since the safety/decocker is on the frame (ala 1911 safety) not on the slide, it cam ba carried onsafe with hammer either up or down. And when coming off safe, the downward push on the safety is much easiser, faster, and mor natural then the awkward up push on the Berreta and most traditional double action semi autos.

Posted by: budd | April 26, 2009 1:13 PM    Report this comment

My 92F is having issues..getting blow-back occasionally which pushes the trigger bar out and thus rendering the gun useless..have sent it into Baretta once, but after another 300 rds, same thing..its on its way back to them. This last time, had I not had eye protection on, I would have developed serious injury..gave me a black eye anyway

Posted by: WILLIE | April 23, 2009 2:13 PM    Report this comment

I'm waiting for a 92fs I won on a auctionarms.com bid.I had to have one after i rented one for a Qual shoot for my Armed security Lic.shot the max score 1st time firing the pistol.In Florida 9mm or 38spl.are only calibers allowed for security work.I will not be worried even with the required FMJ ammo.

Posted by: 2gundavid | February 22, 2009 11:25 AM    Report this comment

TO: USARMY4LIFE Background: After multiple tours in Nam followed by 30 years with the country's largest intellegence and law enforcement entity, I have had to "take" in order to "preserve" (if u get my meaning) on more than one occaision. I've employed 9's and .45ACP. Hands down greatest fighting handgun, in my opinion, is the 1911.

Posted by: steek65 | February 12, 2009 9:21 AM    Report this comment

First, let me say to steek65 a sincere thank you for your service to our country. Second, I always wanted a Beretta 92F but ended up buying a Taurus PT92AF instead based on price. The Taurus has a different safety and may not be as accurate as the Beretta, but it has been 100% reliable. That said, it would not be my first choice for personal defense. For that I would choose one of my Glocks in .40 S&W (preferred) or 9mm (115 gr or 124 gr).

Posted by: Independent_Voice | February 11, 2009 11:29 AM    Report this comment

I have been in the military for 15 years and have used the Beretta M9 military issued for 15 years. The same one. I have never in my service to the greatest country ever had a better side arm. I like it so much that I bought the civilian 92 FS and 92 FS INOX the same year I enlisted after having used the M9. I have never had an issue with any of my pistols. With standard care and attention to what you do these pistols will last a life time. A 9x19 is more than sufficient in any case. The .45 ACP, .45 Colt, or .45 Long Colt is not only less accurate but heavier and require better marksmanship and have worse muzzle flip. I can take down an enemy combatant or street thug just as fast and easy with 9MM as I can any other caliber. Any one who says a 9MM is no good stand down range while I'm firing off a few shots and see just how bad it is. It really upsets me when someone who has never had to fire a pistol at live person in self defense bad mouths the one pistol that has saved countless of my comrades and myself countless times. If you want to complain about something, complain about high gas prices, or unfair treatment at a job. Oh and by the way, my wimpy, no good 9MM has saved my family and served this country more faithfully than your over priced, "big" gun has so don't knock it unless you really want to step in and make a difference.

Posted by: USARMY4LIFE | February 8, 2009 9:18 PM    Report this comment

RE: Comment by Bovparzch and his experience with Berrettas. Now my Least favorite combat/service handgun is the Berretta. I have reached a point long ago when I deceided that I could never again bet my life on one. I spent more than 30 years, bettimg my life each day I went to work.

At one point I was told that my LA SIS speced handgun, was a)not approved for MY use, and later 2) that it's accuracy was questionable. This charge (inaccuracy) I disproved that afternoon.

I've always believed that, within reason, a person should be allowed to carry that with which he was best, and most comfortable!

Posted by: steek65 | February 8, 2009 11:49 AM    Report this comment

"Glock 17 is great except I carry concealed and glock 17 has accidentail discharge issues because glock refuses to put a thumb safety on their weapon. The safety trigger is a joke Comment by: DON WALKER"

Sorry but the Glock doesn't have any issue. ADs (or correctly ND) is caused by one thing: User pulling the trigger. No safety in the world prevents stupidity.

Posted by: Mikarome | January 30, 2009 1:45 PM    Report this comment

Berrettas are overpriced junk, just like harly davidsons, you pay for the name only. My model 92 stoppew working when the action wedge sheared in half, I replaced that, then the roll pin on the rear sight broke leaving me with a wandering rear sight. I bought a px4 storm carbine in March, it broke in April, the buffer is attached with a cheesy piece of crap plastic rod, I finally got the gun back in october and it didnt work. Apparently beretta doesnt test when they fix a gun. I had to figure out what was holding the bolt open by my self, I wasnt about to send it back and not have it for another 6 months

Posted by: bobparzych | December 4, 2008 3:59 PM    Report this comment

Nope - it's "may issue", unless it's changed in about the last 6 months. While most CT Depts. are reasonable, and the state pretty much always issues if a local PD has (never heard of a case where they didn't), not all depts. are, and they can deny if they feel the applicant is not a "suitable person" or has not presented "sufficient need", and those are complete judgment calls, not defined in the law. Some places only issue to people like armed guards and people with pull. To buy a handgun you do not need a permit but it makes it easier. Way before the current federal background check requirement came along, a check through the State Police was required in CT if you did not have a permit. I'd guess the 2 requirements (state and federal) are probably just 1 check now. With a few restrictive "transportation to or from" exceptions, without a permit you cannot carry a handgun in your vehicle or on your person, concealed or not makes no difference, but can have one in your home or place of business. YOUR place of business, one that you own, not just one where you work.

Posted by: tmaca | November 30, 2008 8:36 PM    Report this comment

BTW - exactly what and when were the Petit murders? And while I said that about "appropriate self-defense" just a bit tongue in cheek, there is some truth in it. Especially in a place like Connecticut, where permits are ultimately controlled by the local PD (can't get a state permit without getting a local permit first) and lots of local PDs are anti-gun and just about never give out permits, and get away with it because their citizenry is anti-gun. Luckily, last I heard, you still don't need a permit to have a handgun in your home. But. I used to be a cop in Connecticut. Note that I haven't lived there since the end of the '70s.

Posted by: tmaca | November 30, 2008 1:34 AM    Report this comment

I live in Connecticut. After the Pettit Murders I couldn't care less what anybody thought was appropriate in self defense. I'll empty 3 clips in someone if need be. I'll be damned if my daughter is going to be raped and set on fire while alive. I doubt they will care of I shot them once with a .45 or 3 times with a 9mm.

Regardless, the point was saying the 9mm is “Inadequate for self defense” is idiotic.

Posted by: August | November 28, 2008 10:02 PM    Report this comment

Yup. A .45 is nice, but it's also overkill in 99% of all cases. That's why I even carry a .380 if the weather has me dressing in a way that makes it hard to hide my 9mm or my .40 S&W, and the only handicap I feel I'm under is a lower number of available rounds. Buit let's be real - what are the chances of anyone, especiually a civilian, getting into a long drawn out gunfight?

There was a time when it would be good to be able to deliver as many foot-pounds of energy as you possibly could to the target if you were worried about body armor, but what's available today can defeat just about any handgun round, even a .45. Since most people wearing armor have what they think is a good reason to need it, they usually have the most effective stuff they can get. So even in the incredibly unlikely chance that you run into someone wearing armor, even the .45 probably won't do you a whole lot of good.

As for 2 in the chest and one in the head, it's a good idea but not really all that practical. I'm a pretty fair shot, and can easily put the whole mag in the head out to 40 meters on any range, with either stationary, known location pop-up, or combat simulation targets. But in a real firefight? Not hardly. And I been there and done that, several times.

Besides which, the way things are in some states, some idiot would accuse you of going beyond the reasonable requirements of self defense, and if you didn't get charged, you'd probably get sued by somebody.

Posted by: tmaca | November 28, 2008 8:37 PM    Report this comment

Inadequate for self defense? Wow thats a ridiculous statement.

If I shot you in the chest with a 9mm hollow point, I doubt you would be hanging around sharing a beer with me after.

Furthermore, it would be 2 in the chest and 1 in the head, which is MORE than adequate for "self defense".

Posted by: August | November 28, 2008 10:27 AM    Report this comment

Dude, 3 things: First, the 9 was pretty much mandated for interoperability. We don't plan on going to war as a completely self-sufficient organization anymore, and under the current concept we need to be able to share logistics with allies, which is real hard to do when you're using ammo that's different from what everyone else is using. The percentage mixes may be different, but with us and our NATO allies all using 5.65mm, 9mm, and 7.62mm it gets a lot easier to supply the guy at the front with food for his bullet launcher.

Second, as for adequacy, the Beretta 92 is for close up work. We don't fight drug crazed Moro warriors, which was exactly what the .45 was adopted for, very often anymore. Unless you're Godzilla, see how effective you are with a couple rounds of 9mm in your center of mass that were fired from less than about 10 meters away, a distance that includes something like 95% of all handgun fights.

Finally, as for .40 S&W vs .45ACP, the single round stop percentage difference between the two is something like 94% vs 98%. Not enough of a difference to bother me.

Personally, whether it's from habit, machismo, or just 'cause I can, I am ALWAYS armed. And it is equally as likely to be my 9mm as it is my .40 S&W. Heck, if the weather's hot enough, and I'm wearing really light clothes, it can even be my .380. In fact, the only real reason that I have a .40 is that when I was looking for a Beretta I ran into a great deal on a 96. If it was the 92 instead of the 96, in the same condition and at the same price, I'd have been just as happy buying the 92.

The .45 is sure good at what it does, especially with the old lack of accuracy gone, but in most situations it's more than you really need.

Posted by: tmaca | November 28, 2008 9:10 AM    Report this comment

No matter your opinion, it's still a 9mm. Inadequate for self defense, inadequate for our American warriors. Step it up to a .40 S&W or better yet, arm us with a .45acp., 1911 style preferrably. 9mm is best for vermin control. Raptor

Posted by: raptor | November 28, 2008 8:27 AM    Report this comment

I have an M9 that I`ve been carrying for over two years,plus shooting monthly IDPA matches with.So far,no problems at all.

Posted by: aland | November 20, 2008 7:46 PM    Report this comment

Glock 17 is great except I carry concealed and glock 17 has accidentail discharge issues because glock refuses to put a thumb safety on their weapon. The safety trigger is a joke

Posted by: chl1 | November 9, 2008 8:48 PM    Report this comment

The short-lived order to military armorers to change Beretta slides every 3,000 rds was rarely observed and quickly passed away. A handful of slides did indeed separate during the govt. trials before it was adopted by our Armed Forces in 1985. Most were traceable to NATO ammo that approached 50,000 psi chamber pressure, nearly 30/06 rifle intensity. Many gun companies will privately tell you that their semi-automatic pistols are designed for a 10,000 round service life. Beretta puts no limit on theirs, nor have they warned against +P' +P+, and NATO 9mm ammo.The guns are designed to handle that so how many rounds are you looking at?

Posted by: 95south | November 9, 2008 8:46 PM    Report this comment

I love my 92fsc "C" for compact=12 round mags and approx. 1/2 inch shorter barrel. 15 round mags will fit and fire in my little 92 but they do protrude from the bottom of the grip a bit. I have had no hiccups firing my 92 but I do pay attention to cleaning.

Posted by: Donald B | November 9, 2008 1:33 PM    Report this comment

Mortisha, The Slide assemblies MUST be replaced at the 3,000rd mark, as the slides WILL break somewere at the 6,00rd+ mark. The top end will be safe because of the slide replacements but the frame finnish will look like hell from all the wear these guns get. When these guns were first issued, the were called 92F. When catostrophic slide failures happen, they changed the head on the hammer pin to add a flat disk that clears a groove in the slide on the left side of the frame. If the slide breaks the rear part will jam into the hammer pin thereby stopping the rear part of the slide and trashing the gun as it won't be salvagable.

Posted by: lotoofla | November 7, 2008 11:16 PM    Report this comment

By the way, my 96 has a too heavy, and not perfectly smooth, trigger, too. I've shot a 92 with a trigger job, incredibly smooth and easy pull, and that gun's owner says my 96's trigger is just like his 92's was before the trigger was worked on. My 96 already has an appointment with the gunsmith.

Posted by: tmaca | November 7, 2008 10:22 PM    Report this comment

I resently purchased one of the 9M 9mm and love it to alot. I have shot it it many times and each time it gets better. I wonder if the weapons that the Government boys are firing, Have been fired so many times that they are failing. Keep in mind that these weapons are fired many, many, many, many, many, times since they have been purchased. This is just food for thought. MTW

Posted by: Mortisha | November 7, 2008 7:56 PM    Report this comment

I resently purchased one of the 9M 9mm and love it to alot. I have shot it it many times and each time it gets better. I wonder if the weapons that the Government boys are firing, Have been fired so many times that they are failing. Keep in mind that these weapons are fired many, many, many, many, many, times since they have been purchased. This is just food for thought. MTW

Posted by: Mortisha | November 7, 2008 7:56 PM    Report this comment

My Sig P226 and Berreta 92F are tack drivers when I use Sierras 170Gr Bullets loaded with Power Pistol with and OAL of 1.161 (29.5 mm). Start with sample of 3.9 Grains then keep adding .5Gr with each round till it completely cycles (ejects and locks the side back). Use Winchester or Federal brass, if you have a bulge were the base of the bullet is, it won't work, and it will have very dangerous pressures, the round MUST fall in and out freely from the gun. The only reason I can figure that this load shoots so good in these guns is they have a .25M twist (1x9.8425")which is very fast, and using the 170Gr the bullet goes slow enough that there is less stress on it when it leaves the barrel. One side benefit is it cleans out the crap on the leeward side of the rifleing, making cleaning a lot easier. When using this load in a magazine, use less than 10Rds for reliable feeding, unless you have stiffer mag springs. This load works in these factory barrels with this load BUT may not work with other 9mm Luger guns as chambers are differant.

Posted by: lotoofla | November 7, 2008 5:45 PM    Report this comment

I'd love to see a comparison with the 96, the 92's .40 cal. twin brother.

Posted by: tmaca | November 7, 2008 3:28 PM    Report this comment

My 92SB has had a trigger job, DA approx 7.5 lb and SA 3.5 lb. Improved scoring on bullseye to 475 out of 500 at 25 yards. Big improvement over factory

Posted by: Kail | November 7, 2008 9:04 AM    Report this comment

Have had my millenium (supposedly 1 of 2000)for 7 yrs pu hornady 115,124,147gr hand loads and every other 9mm rd through this gun and it has never that I can remember ftf fte.I find best accuracy from the hornady 147gr hp hand loads.Would trust my life on this gun if had to use 9mm.Not my favorite rd for self defence. P.S.U can put a 40 cal top end in place of 9mm (: God bless america to hell w/Obama

Posted by: blindshot | November 7, 2008 7:54 AM    Report this comment

with a little care the 92f is every much as good then the as your glock 17. i would and have trusted my life on the 92f.

Posted by: drkhawk | November 7, 2008 7:36 AM    Report this comment

Like Jeff, my brother and I both purchased them when the military issued them. I have ran thousands of rounds through it without ever a glitch. My brother had some bad chambering issues only due to magazines and dirt. I have read a lot of negative articals on the 92 and have came to the conclusion that with decent care, it will work fine. Unlike my Glock 17 that can be used to dig a hole in mud and fire perfectly, I wouldn't want to defend my life in a war with the 92.

Posted by: GEORGE C | November 6, 2008 8:49 PM    Report this comment

I obtained a Beretta 92F shortly after the U.S. military made the switch. I fired several thousand rounds and the pistol was very reliable. hard to fault a pistol that goes bang consistantly when you pull the trigger. Sig are great, own three myself, But there is nothing wrong with the Beretta.

Posted by: jeffrey p | November 6, 2008 2:48 PM    Report this comment

I'm SIG OWNER also and I agree with Tom. carbinefred

Posted by: fred s | November 6, 2008 12:51 PM    Report this comment

I'm really surprised that this gun was shot with a "Clinton" magazine instead of the 15+rd that it was made for. The military still has the 3,000 round policy of replacing the slide befor it breaks into your face. The original 92"F" came with a steel guide rod, not the chinzy polymer crap. Sig P226 magazines are interchangable with the Berreta 92FS by carefully cutting a new notch, and the length, feed angle, and the follower are the same and slide in the gun alot easier than the Berreta mags. As I have both the Sig 226, and the Berreta 92F The Sig IS the better gun. Tom

Posted by: lotoofla | November 6, 2008 12:04 PM    Report this comment

Add your comments ...

New to Gun Tests? Register for Free!

Already Registered? Log In