March 2, 2009

Recall: PPK And PPK/S Pistols May Permit a Round To Be Discharged Without The Trigger Being Pulled

Smith & Wesson is recalling all Walther PPK and PPK/S pistols manufactured by Smith & Wesson from March 21, 2002, until February 3, 2009.

Certain PPK and PPK/S pistols may permit a round to be discharged without the trigger being pulled. When the manual safety is disengaged, lowering the hammer may cause a chambered round to fire.

The Serial Numbers of the pistol subject to this recall are as follows:

Recall: PPK And PPK/S Pistols

When the pistol is returned, you should note a punch dot which appears at the back of the frame. This marking is verification that the new hammer block has been installed and that the pistol is safe to handle.

    


  • 0010BAB - 9999BAB
  • 



  • 0000BAC - 9999BAC

  • 


  • 0000BAD - 9999BAD
  • 


  • 0000BAE - 9999BAE
  • 



  • 0000BAF - 9999BAF
  • 


  • 
0000BAH - 9999BAH

  • 


  • 0000BAJ - 9999BAJ

  • 


  • 0000BAK - 9999BAK
  • 



  • 0000BAL - 5313BAL

  • 


  • 0000BAM - 1320BAM

  • 


  • 0000LTD - 0499LTD

  • 


  • 0001PPK - 1500PPK
  • 



  • 0026REP - 0219REP

  • 


  • 0001WLE - 0459WLE

“While we have no reason to believe that the condition affects every pistol produced during the designated period, we have chosen in the interest of safety to replace the hammer block in every (weapon) that is returned,” Smith & Wesson said in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing.

When you return your pistol to Smith & Wesson, the company will replace the existing hammer block feature with a new part at no cost to the gun owner.

When one of the affected PPK/PPKS pistols are returned, you should note a punch dot which appears at the back of the frame. This marking is verification that the new hammer block has been installed and that the pistol is safe to handle.

If you have any questions about this recall, contact Smith & Wesson at
 800-331-0852 or email them at PPK_S@Smith-Wesson.com.

Comments (3)

I purchased my PPK/s about 15 years ago. It is stainless and was made in Virginia by Interarms. It would fail to feed more times than not. I hoped that fireing hundreds of rounds would smooth it up but that did not help. I dropped it off to the gunsmith at Gander Mountain but he said it seemed okay to him and returned it. I bought two more magazines (I now had 4.) but the failure to feed problem persisted. Two years later I dropped it off at Gander Mountain again, hopeing that they would have a different gunsmith. This time they sent the gun to Smith and Wesson, although it was made by Interarms, not Smith. Six weeks later they returned it at no charge. Just a short not that said, "New magazine." I don't know what they actually did but it is now perfect, with all 4 of my magazines and any brand of ammo. Thank you Smith and Wesson.

Posted by: Mike from Syracuse | February 1, 2015 8:52 AM    Report this comment

I owned a PPKs for a short time years ago. It waas supposed to be the benchnarkor "standard" by which similar guns were to be judged. I found it to very accurate in single action mode but with a horrile double action trigger, and it was very fussy about ammo. I traded it off for a gun that would go "bang" every time I wanted it to, and would NOT go "bang" when I didn't want it to. I wouldn't trade my Glock or my Kahr for a basket full of PPKs
Shalom
Bud

Posted by: budd | March 5, 2009 10:32 PM    Report this comment

I had a PPKS 380 about 30 years ago that did the same thing....seems like nothing changed.

Posted by: TOM P | March 5, 2009 3:13 PM    Report this comment

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