Gun Report

Ljungman AG 42B 6.5x55mm

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A touch under four feet long, the Ljungman AG 42B had exactly zero balance or liveliness. Yet it was, we thought, a good rifle. Its action design was unique and took some getting used to, and some shooters would never fully like it, though our test shooters did. The rifle had a good trigger and fine accuracy.

Ljungman AG 42B 6.5x55mm

Gun Details

Manufacturer
Model Name
Model Number
Home Defense
Surplus/Collectible
Hunting
Recreational
Price
Caliber/Gauge
Caliber Plus Cartridge
Capacity
Weight Unloaded
Warranty
Length of Pull
Action Type
Action Finish
Barrel Finish
Sights
Trigger Pull Weight

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This attractive and obviously well-designed and carefully constructed rifle, chambered for the 6.5 x 55 cartridge, presented a big problem. There were no instructions with it, and the rifle had no obvious bolt handle to permit opening it and clearing the action. There were, however, two bulges on the breech cover. The cover could not be pulled rearward, because it was already back as far as it could go. We shoved forward against spring pressure. The cover moved all the way forward until, with a click, all spring pressure suddenly ceased. The cover had become locked together with the bolt carrier and bolt. This assembly could be moved rearward against zero spring force. Early in its rearward motion the bolt carrier unlocked the bolt by camming it upward. The whole assembly then glided rearward in the action rails, revealing the chamber and the magazine.
Here the action cover is linked to the bolt carrier and bolt, and the assembly can be slid forward or back with no spring pressure. The rear action standard lifts out for takedown, and also provided a home for the safety. The tube at the front of the open action is the gas port from the barrel. No rods, just gas, just like the M16.
The big knob (arrow) is one of two used to open the action. Takedown was one of the easiest weve encountered. We thought the stock had been refinished, but it was an excellent job that added to this rifles appeal.
Just behind the front sight was a series of holes that formed a muzzle brake. This heavy rifle with its lower-powered cartridge hardly needed it, we thought. We thought the front sight looked vulnerable. Windage was adjusted by a screw that moved the front blade in its dovetail.

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