Gun Report

American Spirit Arms Corp. Light-Weight Flattop Rifle .223

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We liked this rifle, but some of us didn't like the stock. No problem -- order it any way you want or build a kit. American Spirit offers several variants of the rifle.

American Spirit Arms Corp. Light-Weight Flattop Rifle .223

Gun Details

Manufacturer
Model Name
Model Number
Home Defense
Law Enforcement
Recreational
Competition
Price
Caliber/Gauge
Caliber Plus Cartridge
Capacity
Weight Unloaded
Warranty
Length of Pull
Action Type
Action Finish
Barrel Finish
Sights
Trigger Pull Weight

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Lightest of all three rifles, the American Spirit Arms version was a handy and efficient winner. It had a conventional forend and slim barrel, and shot very well. That stock doesn't collapse. It's rigid. We'd have preferred a conventional stock and the ACOG scope mounted on the carry handle. This flat-top rifle has the Bushmaster's handle mounted here.
Looking pretty much like the other two rifles, the Spirit had conventional and common parts. That's the standard mil-spec pistol grip handle. The 10-shot magazine was plastic.
All the rifles had the forward-assist button, shielded mag release, and flat tops. Spirit offers a variety of kits and complete rifles.
From left, Wilson, Bushmaster and Spirit all had muzzle brakes. The Bushmaster directed gases rearward, and was the largest and loudest brake. Note the absence of fluting on the slim Spirit barrel at right.

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