Taurus TX22 1-TX22141 22 LR

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GUN TESTS GRADE: A

$249

The TX22 is a full-­size grip, polymer-­frame, blowback-­operated, striker­-fire semiautomatic with a single-action trigger. That sounds like a lot, and we found the TX22 does offer a lot of plinker for the money. In the box, along with the pistol, Taurus includes two polymer magazines, a magazine loader and a suppressor adaptor. The suppressor adaptor is a very cool component and eliminates the need to buy a threaded barrel to use a can, such as in the case of the Glock.

Action TypeBlowback semi-auto, striker fired, single action only
Overall Length7.06 in.
Overall Height5.44 in.
Maximum Width1.25 in.
Weight Unloaded17.30 oz.
Weight Loaded26.90 oz.
Barrel4.10 in.
Capacity16
SlideBlack, aluminum
Slide Retraction Effort7.0 lbs.
FrameBlack, polymer
Frame Front Strap Height2.5 in.
Frame Back Strap Height3.5 in.
GripTextured polymer
Grip Thickness (max)1.25 in.
Grip Circumference (max)5.75 in.
Front SightPost with white dot
Rear SightAdjustable, two dots
Trigger Pull Weight5.12 lbs.
Trigger Span2.78 in.
Magazines2; polymer
Manual SafetyThumb lever, trigger
WarrantyUnlimited lifetime
Telephone(305) 624-1115
WebsiteTaurusUSA.com
Made InUSA

The TX22’s barrel is flush with the end on the slide but wears a thread protector. We required a 3⁄8-inch wrench to remove the thread protector and then installed the adapter. You can then screw on a can.

The slide is made of aluminum with forward and rear angled serrations along with a chamfered muzzle. The top edge of the slide is similar to CZ P-10C-series or SIG Sauer P320-series pistols.

In hand, the TX22 offers a full-size grip that is ergonomic as well as user friendly.

The sight are white three-dot style, which we liked. The rear sight is adjustable for windage and elevation via a small screwdriver, though neither screw is marked for windage or elevation. Clockwise is up on the elevation screw and clockwise will move the sight to right with the windage screw. The elevation screw is farthest to the rear and windage screw is closest to the muzzle.

The receiver is polymer and has a grip that reminds us of an HK VP9 or a Walther PPQ. We like this grip. The girth is thin, the surface of the side panels and straps is a smooth sandpaper-like texture. The beavertail is long. A ridge is formed with the trigger guard that guides the trigger finger toward the trigger. The ridge is also the same height as the magazine catch. We thought the magazine catch could have been slightly larger, but that’s nitpicking. The magazine button is reversible. While the grip is exceptionally comfortable, the manual thumb safety is difficult to operate without breaking your grip. We’d suggest a larger lever.

While the manual safety is nice to have, the TX22’s primary safety is built into the trigger. Unlike other striker-fire pistols with a pivoting insert in the trigger to prevent accidental discharge, the TX22 uses a totally different approach. The trigger features three stages. In the first stage, the trigger shoe is rotated to release the trigger safety. In the second stage, which has the most movement, the striker block is raised. In the third stage, the trigger bar pushes the sear, which releases the striker. The trigger pull starts out at about 3 pounds through stages one and two. When you hit stage three, the trigger-pull weight jumps to 5 pounds. Once the striker is released and the slide cycles, the trigger reset is less than a 1⁄4 inch. The trigger is wide and smooth, which we liked a lot.

Field-stripping the TX22 is easy and similar to a Glock. First, pull and release the trigger, then slightly retract the slide, then grasp the locking bar on both sides and pull down. The slide assembly can then be moved forward and up, away from the receiver. The slide rides on four steel rails, which no doubt helps with the pistol’s accura-cy. Of course, verify that all firearms are empty before beginning.

The slide stop on the Taurus is smallish but was easy to manipulate with the firing hand or support hand. We found the magazine to be easy to load. The follower did not require a lot of effort to hold, but we did encounter some cartridges vertically falling into the magazine, which was the operator’s error. The magazine loader helped ensure the tiny cartridges were loaded correctly.

Going hot, we experienced no issues with Remington Thunderbolt ammo. In fact, this inexpensive ammo gave us the best group out of all the pistols and ammo, a five-shot cluster measuring 0.43 inches. The TX22 could really shoot the black out of the center with this ammo. Blazer ammo averaged 0.87-inch groups. We also experienced failure-to-feed jams with the Winchester ammo, but when we did get it to run, our best group was 0.75 inches and it averaged 1.04 inches. We also experienced light primer strikes with the Federal ammo, but when it did run, our best group measured 0.51 inches.

The Taurus TX22’s sights offer a good three-dot sight picture. The rear sight is adjustable. We would like more contrast, such as with a red or green fiber-optic front sight.

The Taurus TX22 offered little felt recoil, as you might expect. The thin, full-size frame made it easy for large-hand shooters to operate as well as average to small-hand users.

Our Team Said: For the price, the TX22 offers a lot of performance and value with the suppressor adaptor. We felt the trigger was easy to master, and we found ourselves having a lot of fun shooting the TX22. Some thought the look of the TX22 was a conglomeration of other pistol styles, so it isn’t the most elegant. We think this would make a great training pistol as well as a great plinker.

Range Data

To collect accuracy data, we fired five-shot groups from a bench using a rest. Distance: 15 yards with the with open sights. We recorded velocities using a ProChrono digital chronograph set 15 feet from the muzzle.
Federal AutoMatch Target 22 Long Rifle 40-grain LRNGlock G44KelTec P17Taurus TX22
Average Velocity915 fps913 fps912 fps
Muzzle Energy74 ft.-lbs.74 ft.-lbs.74 ft.-lbs.
Smallest Group0.44 in.0.83 in.0.51 in.
Average Group0.63 in.0.93 in.0.71 in.
Remington Thunderbolt 22 Long Rifle 40-grain LRNGlock G44KelTec P17Taurus TX22
Average Velocity945 fps919 fps921 fps
Muzzle Energy88 ft.-lbs.75 ft.-lbs.75 ft.-lbs.
Smallest Group0.68 in.0.61 in.0.43 in.
Average Group0.70 in.0.91 in.0.66 in.
Winchester Xpert HV 22 Long Rifle 36-grain HPGlock G44KelTec P17Taurus TX22
Average Velocity924 fps988 fps991 fps
Muzzle Energy68 ft.-lbs.78 ft.-lbs.79 ft.-lbs.
Smallest Group1.00 in.0.98 in.0.75 in.
Average Group1.06 in.1.65 in.1.04 in.
CCI Blazer 22 Long Rifle 38-grain LRNGlock G44KelTec P17Taurus TX22
Average Velocity1016 fps989 fps999 fps
Muzzle Energy87 ft.-lbs.83 ft.-lbs.84 ft.-lbs.
Smallest Group0.57 in.1.16 in.0.75 in.
Average Group0.67 in.1.22 in.0.87 in.
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Having been trained by many top-shelf handgun, shotgun, AR carbine, and long-range shooting instructors, Robert Sadowski brings a user's perspective to Gun Tests. He has authored and edited 15 books on firearm values, firearm disassembly and assembly, and gun guides. His Book Of Glock (Skyhorse Publishing) debuted as an Amazon #1 New Release and is a must-read for the Glock enthusiast. His latest book, 9MM - Guide to America's Most Popular Caliber (Gun Digest Books), is an indispensable resource on the 9mm and understanding the cartridge's performance for concealed carry, home defense, or competition. Over the past two decades, Sadowski has written for many magazines and websites, including tacticallife.com, range365.com, shootingillustrated.com, personaldefenseworld.com and more. His print work has appeared in Combat Handguns, Ballistic, Real World Survivor, Guns Digest, Guns of the Old West, SHOT Business, and more. He is currently the Treasurer/Secretary of the Glock Collectors Association. After receiving an MA from New York University, he worked for a number of magazine publishers and advertising agencies. Sadowski is a lifelong hunter, competitive shooter, and native of Connecticut. He now lives in North Carolina to take full advantage of our 2nd Amendment privilege.

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