Firingline

R1 Enhanced, Old and New

I think the Remington R1 Enhanced Threaded Barrel featured in this article may not actually be the same model you tested and referenced in the past. Remington bought up the out-of-business carcass of Para, aka Para Ordnance, and is now selling 1911 versions of that company's models with the same name as the (very good, actually) R1 1911s it has been selling for the last 10 years or so with its own designs.

Praise for Penetrating Test

I really appreciate the heavy 9mm loads article. I don't have the time or resources to buy and test a bunch of loads, even though I am very interested in selecting a load for my 9mm that fits my needs. You guys did all the work for me! I trust your opinions and appreciate your straightforward approach to testing and review. I now have a few options that I can try to see if they work for me personally. Case in point, I recently went on a hiking trip with my 12-year-old son in cougar, bear, and, unfortunately, now wolf country. I had to choose between a high-capacity 9mm and a 5-round 357 Magnum. I went with the magnum for better penetration potential. But after reading your article, I am definitely going to pick up some Buffalo Bore Outdoorsman Hard Cast Lead Flat Nose cartridges and see if I can get the best of both worlds. Thanks for the great magazine and keep up the good work!

Lever-Action Fans Comment

I enjoyed your review of the 1873 from Uberti. I agree that the rubber recoil pad is distracting and probably unnecessary. I prefer a traditional brass or steel buttplate, but with checkering or texture. On my 1892, I added a leather pad for texture, but only because I couldn't figure out how to checker it appropriately. If I were doing it again, I think I would use pin punches and stipple it. Keep up the good work and unbiased reviews.

38 Special Problem in 357 Mags

I enjoyed the article on 38 Special lever-action rifles, but I think you missed a very important warning. The 38 Special and 357 Magnum are not interchangeable, for reasons other than the strength of the action. I have a Marlin lever action in 357 caliber. I decided to sight it in with 38 Special rounds and then change to 357 and adjust the sights. After about 20 or 30 rounds of 38 Special, I switched to 357. When I tried to rack in the second round, it wouldn't seat. The problem was that the 38 Special rounds carboned up the chamber, and when the 357 round was extracted, only about half of the cartridge came out. I had to have a gunsmith remove the front half of the casing. I only shoot 357 rounds in my rifle and revolver since then. I have never seen this in any article which discusses using 38 Special ammo in a 357 chamber.

38 Special Problem in 357 Mags

I enjoyed the article on 38 Special lever-action rifles, but I think you missed a very important warning. The 38 Special and 357 Magnum are not interchangeable, for reasons other than the strength of the action. I have a Marlin lever action in 357 caliber. I decided to sight it in with 38 Special rounds and then change to 357 and adjust the sights. After about 20 or 30 rounds of 38 Special, I switched to 357. When I tried to rack in the second round, it wouldn't seat. The problem was that the 38 Special rounds carboned up the chamber, and when the 357 round was extracted, only about half of the cartridge came out. I had to have a gunsmith remove the front half of the casing. I only shoot 357 rounds in my rifle and revolver since then. I have never seen this in any article which discusses using 38 Special ammo in a 357 chamber.

38 Special Problem in 357 Mags

I enjoyed the article on 38 Special lever-action rifles, but I think you missed a very important warning. The 38 Special and 357 Magnum are not interchangeable, for reasons other than the strength of the action. I have a Marlin lever action in 357 caliber. I decided to sight it in with 38 Special rounds and then change to 357 and adjust the sights. After about 20 or 30 rounds of 38 Special, I switched to 357. When I tried to rack in the second round, it wouldn't seat. The problem was that the 38 Special rounds carboned up the chamber, and when the 357 round was extracted, only about half of the cartridge came out. I had to have a gunsmith remove the front half of the casing. I only shoot 357 rounds in my rifle and revolver since then. I have never seen this in any article which discusses using 38 Special ammo in a 357 chamber.

What About the Ithaca Pump?

Re "Home-Defense Shotguns: Are Magazine-Feds the New Thing?" October 2018 I received my copy and enjoyed the article. I was curious as to why you...

Two Thumbs Up for EZ, 911

Jackpot! You reviewed and gave an "A" grade to two guns that I am very interested in. First is the S&W M&P 380 Shield EZ. I am an NRA instructor and we are constantly faced with the problem of recommending a semi-auto gun for women and older students who have trouble loading the magazine, racking the slide, and handling recoil. I have felt that the S&W Shield EZ would be perfect for them, but haven't had a chance to fire one. Your review solves that — I now feel that I can recommend it with confidence.

Reloading Advice from Veterans

I want to thank you for publishing the article on automatic powder dispensers. Although I think you may catch some flack for those who think Gun Tests should just test guns, and maybe ammo, I find that articles such as these are very helpful and informative for those of us who pursue reloading, gunsmithing or other peripheral "hobbies."

Rifles Not Ready for 50 States

Please consider the following. The issue of gun control, regardless of degree, is a cultural issue — not a national safety issue. When the Constitution was written, less than 15% of our population lived in urban areas. Today, approximately 80% of our population is urban. However, cities account for only about 5% of the geographical landmass of this country. We now have two opposing gun cultures in this country — with urbans believing guns are only for killing people and rurals viewing them as tools, much as a rod and reel are for fishing.

The Price of Handgun Accuracy: How Much to Pay for 3/4s of an Inch?

Another handgun magazine recently ran an article praising the 25-yard accuracy of a 9mm 1911 Ed Brown CCO pistol ($3,585). It shot 2-inch groups using high performance ammo. Curious about how my used S&W 9mm Shield V1 ($269) with a drop-in stainless-steel barrel ($170) would do, I staged my own comparison test. Using SIG Sauer Elite Performance JHP 124-grain ammo, my Shield shot a 2.75-inch group from the rest. The question I have for you and your readers is this: Is the extra 0.75 inch in accuracy at 25 yards worth the additional $3146?

More On Self-Defense Insurance

Mr. Woodard: Thank you for the surprising but timely article on self-defense insurance. As a former insurance professional, I was aware of the "hidden" differences in insurance policies of all kinds, but I was unaware of many of the differences in types of self-defense insurance for gun-toters like myself — particularly regarding bail bonds. What a great and timely article for your readers who believe in concealed carry/home defense!

A Supreme Disappoinment

I was hopeful that the Supreme Court would take up at least one gun-rights case that had seemingly ripened enough for the justices to...